Presentations Investors Will Love and Fund

It is never easy raising money but it just got a whole lot tougher. Are there tried and trusted techniques to turn investors on? Yes there are. The secret sauce ingredients include: rigorous preparation, a great compelling story, delivered with passion by a credible management team.

Let’s break it down into three parts, preparation, content, and delivery.

Preparation

First, gather together answers to questions that will be asked by the business angel, venture capitalist or private equity player. What is the status of your industry in terms of trends and statistics? The key is to sound authoritative. Demonstrate that your team understands this market without being verbose. The value proposition – does it connect with customers? Why now? What makes the management team credible? Which analysts validate your strategy? How will you make money? Be clear on the itch you are scratching! What business am I in? Be clear why you are remarkable. Is it a very competitive space and if so why will you succeed? Little competition – does anyone want to spend money on your solution? Get on top of the detail. Memorize key facts. Be ready to explain the volume and yield drivers behind you historical numbers. Show your mastery of the economics of your business. Build a business plan that summarizes the policies you need to run the business. Ensure all key policies are articulated in a detailed way. A great business plan allows you to produce a great one page executive summary. Finally do your due diligence on potential funders, including studying their web site to discover their portfolio, previous exits, investment criteria, and bio of partners.

Content

What do I cover in my business plan and my executive summary? Write an enjoyable compelling story that covers: how much money you need, how you will spend it, how much your business is worth, why customers love you, how you will make money, why is it scalable, what makes your leadership team credible, what is the competitive landscape, and explain barriers to entry and the risks of what could go wrong. Prepare many what-if scenarios. Use the one page executive summary to get interviews and then use a few power points as props to deliver your story. Talk with confidence knowing your speech is backed up by a rigorous business plan.

Delivery

The executive summary has been sent, hit the bull’s-eye and has resulted in a face to face meeting. How do you handle a face to face meeting? Words of caution! First 60 seconds are unreasonably important. Lead with your strongest, most remarkable statement. Remember eye contact is vital so you don’t want an audience getting lost in the deep and meaningful graphs instead of looking at you. Length of presentation? Maximum 20 minutes with big changes of pace every 5 minutes. Talk slowly. Use a maximum of five power points. Involve key members of your team to make key points. Finish with a very strong 60 seconds bringing together the proposition and clear next steps.

It’s Very Important To Know All You Can About Our US Presidents – Including the Present One

Our founding fathers wanted a citizen’s government. They wanted normal people to be involved in choosing the direction of our nation, not just elite leaders, members of certain families, or special groups of people that got together to serve their own interests rather than the will of the people. At the same time they wanted to make sure that those who were in government and even those that voted had a vested stake in the future of this great nation.

This is why only land owners were allowed to vote at first. They also realized the challenges of an electorate that might utilize the government and take unfair advantage of the nation’s treasury and resources. That of course is very wise thinking isn’t it? The great thing about the United States is that we believe that anyone can become president and rise to that highest office, that everyone has a chance to succeed.

Still, it’s very important to understand who our leaders are, what they think, how they think, and if they are fully qualified. The position these days, seeing as the United States is the only world’s true superpower, mean our president is in essence the leader of the free-world and therefore, well let’s just say the stakes are quite high aren’t they?

Today, in 2012 the US electric has reelected our first black president, a testament to our diversity, and belief in our own system of freedom, liberty, and pursuit of happiness. A belief in opportunity for all – that’s a wonderful thing, a noble cause, an incredible accomplishment for humankind as I’m sure you will agree.

Nevertheless, there is a very good book to read about President Barack Obama, this is a book I do own and often recommend to those who voted for him. You see, I believe everyone should know all there is to know about our sitting president whoever that might be at any particular present period. The name of the book I want to recommend is;

“The Amateur – Barack Obama in the White House” by Edward Klein, Regnery Book Publishers (an Eagle Publishing Company), Washington DC, 2012, 277 pages, ISBN: 978-1-59698-2.

This author also wrote the book; “The Truth About Hillary” many years the prior. This book suggests amongst other things that “Bill Clinton loathes Barack Obama and attempted to get Hillary to run against him,” and “how Obama split from the Kennedy family,” and “how Obama has taken a personal role in foreign policy more than any president since Richard Nixon – with disastrous results.”

After I read this book, I was rather shaken up and I felt that I knew less about our president than I ever had despite all that I had learned from the media, and in reading the president’s three memoirs which account for most of his wealth, that we know about. I encourage everyone to read this book and take a balanced approach, and consider how very important it is to know all you can about our US presidents, including the present one. Please think on it.

Who’s Afraid of the Big, Bad Presentation? – How the Pros Make Nervousness Their Friend

“There are two types of speakers. Those who get nervous and those who are liars.”

-Mark Twain

Everyone is afraid of a presentation, physiologically. Toastmasters International reports that the following professionals have admitted to feeling nervous when speaking in public: Mark Twain, Ronald Reagan, Carroll O’Connor, Barbara Streisand, Anthony Quinn, Garrison Keillor, Sally Struthers, George Burns, James Taylor, Liza Minelli, Joan Rivers, and… Mary Sandro. I couldn’t resist adding my name to such a star-studded list!

Many presenters fight their nervousness. They deny it or use it as an excuse for not presenting. The first step to making nervousness our friend is to accept that it is normal. I dare say, the more nervous we are, the better a presenter we can be. The rationale for this seemingly ludicrous claim lies in the physiological understanding of nervousness.

Making a presentation is an opportunity and a challenge. Any time we are faced with a challenge, our bodies produce adrenaline. Psychologists refer to this as the “Fight or Flight” response and there is no way to stop it. It is wired into our genetic makeup and our bodies have been producing adrenaline for thousands of years.

Adrenaline is a fancy word for energy. When we are faced with a challenge, like making a presentation, our bodies produce energy. That almost sounds helpful, doesn’t it? In fact, from this point forward we will never call it nervousness again. We don’t get nervous; we have excess energy! All of those nervous symptoms we experience like dry mouth, shaky knees, hyperventilation, and butterflies are nothing more than excess energy getting the best of us. Now, what if we could take that energy and get the best of it?

Energy is a necessary ingredient for a successful presentation. Nervous presenters have a lot of raw energy available to them, which is why I claim they can become great presenters. This is also why I disagree with the advice most often given to nervous presenters, “Just relax.” This advice is counterproductive and almost physically impossible to execute.

When was the last time you went into a performance or a competition relaxed? Maybe the last time you didn’t perform very well. We need energy. Some call this energy the competitive edge. Some call it inevitable. It’s very difficult to fight thousands of years of evolution. If we think a presentation is a challenge, which it is, our bodies are programmed to produce adrenaline or energy. Instead of trying to fight this natural, helpful phenomenon, why not use it?

The difference between a polished presenter and one who seems to be having a nervous breakdown is not that one is nervous and the other is not. Physiologically they both are producing excess energy. The difference is how they use the energy. Polished presenters use the energy positively. Historically nervous presenters can too.

In general, things exist in pairs, on a pole as opposites. For example, there is hot and cold, light and dark. Things on the same pole can be changed into one another. Light can be changed into dark and hot can be changed into cold, but cold cannot be changed into light. The same is true with emotions.

Emotions exist in pairs, on a pole as opposites. For example, there is happy and sad, love and hate, anxiety and anticipation. Happy and sad are of the same pole and can be changed from one to the other. The same is true with anxiety and anticipation. Nervous presenters allow their energy to manifest as anxiety, while polished presenters channel that energy into anticipation.

The same energy that creates nervousness or anxiety can create anticipation or excitement. There are many strategies for shifting the energy to the higher end of the pole. The most helpful are mental strategies. To keep the energy anticipatory and exciting, focus thoughts on positive aspects of presenting. Visualize only success. Imagine the benefits of presenting and focus on the opportunity rather than the challenge.

Another strategy for shifting the energy is to get in touch with the physical feeling of anxiety in our body. Where is the feeling centered? Is it in the gut, throat, or somewhere else? Once located, move it up one inch higher and notice how the emotion changes. This mental and physical relocation will shift the emotion to the higher, more positive pole of anticipation or excitement. Do this exercise anytime nervousness strikes, even just before the presentation.

To summarize, everyone gets nervous when they present, even the pros. Nervousness is nothing but excess energy that we can use to generate an emotional state of anxiety or anticipation. Be gentle with yourself and make friends with the energy by focusing on the positive aspects of presenting. Know that the energy can propel you to great presentations by giving you the necessary competitive edge.